(Prompt) Wake Me Up

Come to my lips
When I’m feeling low
You’re my cheerleader
Rah rah rah, let’s go!
Hype me, invigorate me
Through my veins
Send electricity

Midday still by my side
Get me through workday slumps
My loyal assistant
You make life less rough
When you go down
A smile crosses my lips
You help me to function
And give me my bliss

I breathe you in
Dark and sweet
Your taste lingers with me
Penetrates deep
My warm, cozy blanket
Wrap me up one more time

The last sip of coffee
Always divine

Prompt: Persona Grata

“I walked abroad, / And saw the ruddy moon lean over a hedge / Like a red-faced farmer.” In an interview with Anselm Berrigan at Literary Hub, John Yau, winner of the 2018 Jackson Poetry Prize, talks about puzzling over the personification in these lines from T. E. Hulme’s 1909 poem “Autumn.” In what way does personification affect imagery in poetry? Write a poem that uses personification in a straightforward yet unexpected way. How does this kind of description enhance not only the perception of the object being personified, but also the idea of personhood and the narrator’s idiosyncratic perspective?

As I was writing this, coffee became a person…a supporter, a lover, a friend. I contemplated what picture I would put for this, and at first it was a cup of coffee. But then I realized that it would give people ideas before they read it, so I decided against it. A lot of my work has these “plot twists” and I love the emotional reactions they get. Thus, I left it for the reader to discover!

The Time Is Now (from the awesome website Poets and Writers, https://www.pw.org ) offers free prompts every Tuesday, to help get your creative juices flowing or to challenge you to try something different.  What would YOU do with the same prompt? Leave a comment with your poem and you may be featured! Also, remember to like and subscribe for more original poetry!

Next Prompt: Plant Life

(Prompt) Paint Me Like A French Girl

Twisted lid comes off
Two slender fingers move in
They slide out newly covered
Nude, smooth
Dragging matte
Underneath a tired right eye
Tired left eye
War paint
Camouflage
To hide the responsibilities
Marked on her face
Blended to build
A new facade
Of perfection

Prompt: The Little Things

How many times have you tossed away a used tea bag without a second thought? In an interview series for New York Times Magazine, author Emily Spivack asks artist Laure Prouvost about the use of tea in her work, and specifically about a tea bag she’s kept for fifteen years once used by her grandmother. “I like that you can look at something that seems like nothing, like a very, very boring object, but it’s got so much history,” Prouvost says. Choose an everyday object that seems unexceptional, perhaps something ordinarily discarded, and write a poem that delves into a deeper history that adds complexity or magical importance. How does taking an in-depth look give more value to an object?

The Time Is Now (from the awesome website Poets and Writers, https://www.pw.org ) offers free prompts every Tuesday, to help get your creative juices flowing or to challenge you to try something different.  Feel free to join us and to see what you can do with the same prompts! Leave a comment with your poem and you may be featured!

(Prompt) My Neurons Can’t Decide What to Eat

The Time Is Now (from the awesome website Poets and Writers, https://www.pw.org ) offers free prompts every Tuesday, to help get your creative juices flowing or to challenge you to try something different.  So, every Tuesday we will be using their prompts to experiment and expand and have a little fun!  Feel free to join us every Tuesday, we’ll be doing the previous week’s prompt to let everyone have a chance to write something.  Leave a comment with your poem and you may be featured!  Remember to like and subscribe for more poetry prompts!

7/31 Prompt: Love Scientifically

What can science tell us about love? Make your own discoveries by writing a love poem inspired by a scientific concept or phenomenon. For inspiration, consider Henri Cole’s “Gravity and Center,” Ruth Madievsky’s “Electrons,” or Sara Eliza Johnson’s “Combustion.” Name your poem after a scientific phrase you find by looking through a science textbook, website, or article. Search for material that casts unexpected light upon your love poem.

This prompt is interesting, specifically because my career field is scientific.  I am studying to get my second degree in psychology.  I also suffer from depression and anxiety, and I’ve done my best to normalize it.  It’s no big deal.  I don’t often write about it though, in my poetry.  It just tends to mirror how I feel–which tends to be apathy or sadness or hopelessness or not feeling right in my body.  So here goes!

Title:  My Neurons Can’t Decide What to Eat

No socks today
No more restriction
Tear off the sheets
It’s too hot in my skin
Sweat down my head
I think I’m leaking
Ideas, Wants, Needs
What do I need
Besides no socks?
I hear words
They bring tears
But I have no idea why
No tables today
Can’t get out of bed
Don’t want to sit up
But I’m so goddamn hungry
Please, eat something
It’s too salty, sweet, hot, cold
My tear ducts are dry
My only want is to cry
Breath is meaningless
Serotonin, norepinephrine
Going back in
Stop it brain, I need them back
I need them back please
So they can decide what to eat.

Next week’s prompt: Persona Grata

(Prompt) I learned–didn’t I?

The Time Is Now (from the awesome website Poets and Writers, https://www.pw.org ) offers free prompts every Tuesday, to help get your creative juices flowing or to challenge you to try something different.  So, every Tuesday we will be using their prompts to experiment and expand and have a little fun!  Feel free to join us every Tuesday, we’ll be doing the previous week’s prompt to let everyone have a chance to write something.  Leave a comment with your poem and you may be featured!  Remember to like and subscribe for more poetry prompts!

Prompt from 7/17:  Wholesome.

Think of something in your life that has been either physically or figuratively broken, fragmented, or made distant, and write a poem that attempts to restore its wholeness. How might you use the ideas of rejoining parts, searching for new openings, or creating connections for empathy, to write a poem that begins to make what is broken whole?

Not sure how
Somehow in my academic folly
A cursor became scary
And I thought myself a fraud.

Who is this trespasser
With her books and statistics
Are they looking down at me
Or am I supposed to step up.

They told me to break the wall
That they put in front of me
If it wasn’t hard, everyone
Would do it, right?

Not sure if I made the best choice
But here I am halfway up
And with every word I write
A brick falls down.

Surreptitiously, I rebel
Against the mantra
“All you are is this”
To keep my sanity,, heal my hurt.

I learned
I am not perfect
I am not the smartest in the room
That no reinforcements were coming.

I learned
I am my own enemy
I am capable
That it’s one step at a time.

Armed with the truth
The scientist is king
Armed with my truth
I can push forward.

Knocking down
Building up
One day the data will make sense
One day it will be significant.

Next week’s prompt:  Love Scientifically